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News Advisory
RI Department of Environmental Management
235 Promenade Street, Providence, RI 02908
(401) 222-2771 TDD/(401) 222-4462
FOR AP AND METRO NEWS DAYBOOKS:
Date: Saturday, June 15, 2013

Time:

10 a.m.
Location: Rooftop of the Pawtucket Fire Department, 155 Roosevelt Ave., Pawtucket
Event: DEM to Release Two Peregrine Falcon Siblings Back to Their Nesting Area in Pawtucket

For Release:

June 13, 2013
Contact: Gail Mastrati 222-4700 ext. 2402

DEM TO RELEASE TWO PEREGRINE FALCONS BACK TO NEST AREA AT PAWTUCKET CITY HALL ON SATURDAY

PROVIDENCE - The Department of Environmental Management will release two young peregrine falcons back to their nesting area from the roof of the Pawtucket Fire Station at 155 Roosevelt Avenue on Saturday, June 15. The birds' nest is located at Pawtucket City Hall. The parent falcons are in the nest and are feeding two other juvenile peregrine falcons.

The juvenile falcons, who are siblings, are approximately seven to eight weeks old and were picked up by DEM environmental police officers last week. The female bird was found on June 1 behind the fire department next to Pawtucket City Hall, and the male was found on June 4 in Slater Park. Both birds were found on the ground and were not injured. It is believed that the birds were learning to fly when they got away from their nest.

The birds were given a physical exam by a veterinarian and were then sent to wildlife rehabilitation centers. One falcon was treated at the Born to Be Wild Nature Center in Bradford, a center run by Vivian Maxson that specializes in raptors. The other falcon was treated by Dr. Meredith Bird at the Wildlife Clinic of RI. Both falcons are currently being cared for by Vivian Maxson at the Born To Be Wild Nature Center.

According to wildlife experts, juvenile falcons sometimes get away from the nest when learning to fly. It can be difficult flying back up to where their nest is, but their parents are never too far away to keep an eye on them and care for them. The birds are being released near their nest so that their parents will be able to continue to care for them away from the general public.

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